25+ Best Freshwater Fish For 5 Gallon Tank

One of the perks of fish keeping and a reason for the popularity of fish is that keeping fish does not need much space. Unlike you can get a tank as small as 5 gallons and start keeping different varieties of colorful fishes there. But the thing you must be careful about is the right fish to keep in a 5-gallon tank. You may be surprised to hear this, but there is a wide range of best fish that you can keep in a 5-gallon tank. So, what are they then! 

Some of the popular fish that you can keep in your 5-gallon tank are Mollies, guppies, Betta fish, Neon tetras, Sparkling Gourami, Cherry Barbs, and Rummy nose tetra. Other best fish for a 5-gallon tank are Chilli Rasboras, Cherry Shrimps, Honey Gourami, Clown Killifish, Endler’s livebearers, and more.

There are a lot more names to add to this list. So, be ready to know all about the best fish you can keep in your 5-gallon tank with ease. Undoubtedly, this article will solve some of the questions in your mind. 

However, before we dig into the context, let me first tell you why people usually choose a 5-gallon tank. Do you know it? If yes! It’s a bonus, if not then don’t miss it. 

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Why Should You Choose A 5 Gallon Fish Tank?

Aquariums come in all shapes and sizes. Some people have the space for a large tank, while others may only have room for a small one. A five-gallon aquarium is a popular size because it’s small enough to fit on most surfaces but large enough to house several tiny fish.

7 Tank Mates For Betta Fish

Another important reason some aquarists prefer a tank as small as 5 gallons is its ease of maintenance. A small space means less water to clean and filter and fewer fish produce more waste. This also makes small tanks ideal for beginners who are still getting used to the caretaking process.

However, small fish tanks are not too easy to care for as you suspect. Therefore, you need to research the best fish to keep and the ideal way to maintain the tank beforehand.

So, what kind of fish is best for a 5-gallon tank then??

What Kind Of Fish Is Best For A 5 Gallon Tank?

Before heading on to the best fish, let us first take a look at the kind of fish that fits in a 5-gallon tank. However, do not get confused about the kinds and best fish. When I say kinds, I am basically trying to explain to you what types of fish, in general, are best to keep in a small tank.

Well! You won’t argue on the fact that a 5-gallon tank is a comparatively very small tank. So, the first requirement for the fish to live in this tank is its size. To keep them in the small tank, your fish must be small in size, mostly not more than 3 inches.

Another very crucial thing is its hardiness. The water fluctuates more in a small tank, so the fish must be resistant to little changes in water parameters. Finally, another important thing to note is that your fish must not be too active or aggressive types.

I would rather suggest keeping a peaceful and docile fish for your 5-gallon tank, like killifish, White cloud mountain minnows, etc.

Things To Consider When Stocking Fish In A 5 Gallon Tank?

Actually, keeping fish in a tank as small as 5 gallons is a daunting task. It is not as easy as it seems. Therefore, here are a few things that you need to consider before you keep your beautiful pals in the tank. Like:

Do Not Overcrowd The Tank

Overcrowding and cramping are very common problems in a  small tank like this. This is one of the reasons people shy away from stocking a small tank. That being said, it is still possible to have a few fish in your tank if you do it right.

The rule of thumb is to allow for about a gallon of water per inch of fish. Although this rule does not work in all cases, it does give you an idea about a general number. For example, you could have five one-inch fish or two and a half to three-inch fish in a five-gallon tank.

However, I will always suggest keeping less than that if you ask me. It is important to remember that you will also need to account for the space that the decorations and gravel will take up in the tank.

Maintainance Of Tank

Another important factor to consider is how much time and effort you are willing to put into maintaining the tank. A small tank will need to be cleaned more often than a larger tank. This means you will need to do weekly water changes and vacuum the gravel regularly.

You will also need to be very diligent about cleaning the filter. A clogged or dirty filter can quickly lead to problems in a small tank. So, if you are not willing to put in the time to clean and maintain the tank, then a small tank is not for you.

Tank Shape

The shape of your tank can also play a role in how many fish you can keep. For example, a five-gallon rectangular tank will generally hold more fish than a five-gallon hexagon tank. Therefore, when choosing your tank, be sure to consider the shape as well.

Choose The Right Fish

Not all fish are created equal, and not all fish are suitable for a small tank. Therefore, when stocking your tank, you will need to be very careful about the fish you choose.

Some fish are simply too large for a small tank and will not do well in the limited space. Other fish produce too much waste and will quickly pollute the water in the tank. Therefore, be very careful about what you choose.

So, what are the best fish for a 5-gallon tank then!

Best Fish For A 5 Gallon Tank

There are indeed wide varieties of fish that you can choose from in a 5-gallon tank. Just take a look at all the 25 options I have for you. I bet you will certainly find the best fish for you and your 5-gallon house tank.

Cherry Shrimp (Neocaridina davidi)

red cherry shrimp

Cherry Shrimp (Neocaridina davidi) is a freshwater species that originates from Taiwan. These shrimp are popular among aquarium hobbyists because they are relatively easy to care for and have a peaceful temperament. Cherry shrimp are also very versatile when it comes to their diet, and they can be kept in a variety of different water parameters. Adults typically grow to be around 1-2 inches in size, making them well-suited for a 5-gallon tank. 

When it comes to the caring level, cherry shrimp are considered beginner-friendly. In terms of personality, cherry shrimp are generally peaceful and look beautiful swimming around in a tank. However, cherry shrimp are Omnivores and will eat various foods when it comes to diet. 

In terms of water parameters, cherry shrimp can tolerate a wide range of conditions but prefer slightly acidic water with a pH between 6.5 and 7.5. Therefore, the ideal number of cherry shrimp to keep in a 5-gallon tank is 3-5 shrimp.

Honey Gourami (Trichogaster chuna)

honey gourami

Honey gouramis are a small, peaceful species of fish perfect for beginners. They max out at around 2.5 inches in adult size, and they have a very peaceful temperament. They thrive on a diet of small insects and larvae, and they prefer water with soft sandy substrates and plenty of hiding places. 

Honey gouramis are also known for being excellent jumpers, so make sure your tank has a tight-fitting lid! They’re moderate swimmers and do best in groups of 3 or more, making them a perfect choice for a 5-gallon tank. 

When it comes to caring, honey gouramis are relatively easy to care for as long as you maintain the proper water parameters. Weekly water changes of 20-30% are sufficient, and they should be kept in water with a pH between 6.5 and 7.5. Honey gouramis are a great choice for beginner aquarists, and they add a beautiful pop of color to any tank!

Clown Killifish (Aplochelius Annulatus)

clown killifish

Clown killifish is a small freshwater fish that are native to Africa. They get their name from their bright colors and patterns, which resemble those of a clown. Clown killifish is a popular choice for aquariums because they are peaceful and easy to care for. However, they prefer to live in groups, so keeping at least three fish together is best.

Clown killifish adult size is only about 2 inches, making them a good choice for smaller tanks. They are also a relatively low-maintenance fish and can be easily kept in a 5-gallon tank. The ideal number of clown killifish to keep in 5 gallons of water is 3-5 fish.

The key to keeping clown killifish happy and healthy is to maintain stable water parameters. They prefer water on the alkaline side, with a pH of 7.5-8.5. The water should also be well-filtered and moderately hard. 

Clown killifish are not picky eaters and will accept most types of dry flake food. However, it is important to supplement their diet with live or frozen foods like brine shrimp or bloodworms. Lastly, clown killifish are active swimmers, so they need plenty of open space to swim in their tank. Given these needs, clown killifish can be a perfect fit for your small tank.

Endler’s Livebearers (Poecilia wingei)

Endler’s Livebearers

Endler’s Livebearers are a great choice for a 5-gallon tank. They are small, only reaching about 1.5 inches as adults, and are relatively peaceful. They are also easy to care for and can tolerate a wide range of water parameters. 

Endler’s Livebearers are omnivorous, so they will eat most types of fish food. They prefer to swim in the middle to the top level of the tank, so they are a good choice for a community tank. If you plan to keep Endler’s Livebearers in a 5-gallon tank, it is best to keep only 3 or 4 fish. This will give them enough space to swim and reduce the risk of aggression.

Harlequin Rasboras (Trigonostigma heteromorpha)

Harlequin Rasbora

The adult size of Harlequin Rasboras is only about 1.5 inches, so they are a perfect fish for a 5-gallon tank. They have a very peaceful temperament and mostly stick to themselves, but they also do well in groups. It’s generally recommended to keep at least 6 of them in a 5-gallon tank, but less is always better. They are omnivores, so their diet consists of both meaty and plant-based foods. 

As for water parameters, they prefer neutral to slightly acidic water that is well-oxygenated. Harlequin rasboras are mid-level swimmers and do best when there are some plants or other decorations to swim around and hide in. As far as care level goes, they are very easy to take care of and don’t require any special care beyond regular maintenance of the tank.

Neon Tetras (Paracheirodon innesi)

Tetra Fish Care

Neon tetras are among the most popular fish for home aquariums, and it’s easy to see why. These colorful little fish are relatively easy to care for and add a splash of brightness to any tank. Neon tetras are also relatively small, only growing to about 1-2 inches as adults. This makes them good for smaller tanks, such as a 5-gallon tank. When it comes to stocking a 5-gallon tank with neon tetras, the ideal number is 6-8 fish. Any more than that, and the water quality will start to decline, putting your fish at risk. 

Neon tetras are peaceful fish to be kept with other peaceful species. They do best in slightly warmer water (around 70-80 degrees Fahrenheit) and prefer a tank with plenty of hiding places. Plants are a great way to provide shelter for neon tetras, and live plants will also help keep the water clean. Neon tetras are omnivores, so they require a diet that includes both meaty and vegetable-based foods. You can feed them pellets or flakes designed for small fish or can supplement their diet with live or frozen foods.

Guppy

the best fish for beginners: Guppy

Guppies are a popular choice for beginner fishkeepers, and it’s easy to see why. They are relatively easy to care for, and they come in various colors and patterns. Guppies are also relatively small, so they can do well in smaller tanks. 

Guppies are a good option when it comes to stocking a 5-gallon tank. The adult size is only 2.5 inches, so you can keep a few of them in a smaller tank. If you’re thinking of adding guppies to your tank, aim for 3-5 fish – any more than that, and you might start to see aggression or fighting.

Additionally, guppies are peaceful fish, so they can be kept with a variety of other fish species. However, it’s important to note that guppies require clean water, so you will need to be diligent about changing and maintaining proper water parameters. Guppies are also known to be prolific breeders, so you may end up with more fish than you started with! 

Mollies (Poecilia sphenops)

Is My Molly Fish Blind

When it comes to choosing a fish for a 5-gallon tank, mollies are undoubtedly one of the best options you have. These hardy fish are relatively easy to care for and can thrive in various water conditions. However, mollies are also social creatures, so they do best when kept in groups. 

In a 5-gallon tank, the ideal number of mollies is 3-4. This will give them enough space to swim and explore without feeling crowded. One thing to keep in mind is that mollies can reach an adult size of 4 inches, so they will need some room to grow. 

Another important consideration is diet. Mollies are omnivores, so they need a balanced diet of meat and plants. In terms of care level, mollies are relatively low-maintenance fish. However, they do require regular water changes and some basic filtration. All in all, mollies make an excellent choice for a 5-gallon tank and are sure to provide hours of enjoyment.

White Cloud Moutain Minnow (Trigonostigma heteromorpha)

White Cloud Mountain Minnow

The White Cloud Mountain Minnow is a great choice for a 5-gallon tank. Adult size is only 1.5 inches, so it won’t take up much space in your tank. This fish is also very peaceful, making it a good choice if you don’t want any aggression in your tank. 

The White Cloud Mountain Minnow is also a very easy fish to care for and can tolerate a wide range of water parameters. This fish is also a good swimmer and will spend most of its time near the top of the tank. The ideal number of fish to keep in 5 gallons of water would be 3-4 fish.

Betta Fish (Betta splendens)

black orchid betta

Betta fish are a popular choice for many aquarium enthusiasts, and it’s not hard to see why. These beautiful fish come in a wide variety of colors and patterns, and they are relatively easy to care for. But what many people don’t realize is that bettas are actually quite picky when it comes to their living conditions. 

In the wild, bettas inhabit slow-moving streams and ponds in Southeast Asia. These waters are typically murky and heavily vegetated, providing plenty of places for bettas to hide from predators. They are also typically quite shallow, so a 5-gallon tank is actually the perfect size for adult bettas. This gives them enough room to swim around without being overstimulated, and it also helps maintain stable water parameters. 

The general rule of thumb is one adult betta per 5 gallons of water in terms of stocking. However, it’s important to remember that bettas are notoriously aggressive, so two males should never be kept in the same tank. Moreover, if you’re looking for a more peaceful community aquarium, you might be better off with another species of fish. 

Least Killifish (Heterandria Formosa)

Least Killifish

The least killifish (Heterandria formosa) is a small freshwater fish native to the southeastern United States. Adult size is only 1”-1.5”, making it one of the smallest freshwater fish available. Despite its small size, it is a very active swimmer and does best in a tank of at least 5 gallons. The ideal number of fish to keep in a 5-gallon tank is 3-5, but they can also be kept in pairs. 

But Least killifish are not ideal for community tanks because of their aggressive nature, but they can be kept with other peaceful species of similar size. They are bottom-dwellers and prefer tanks with plenty of hiding places. 

Least killifish are not picky eaters and will accept most types of live, frozen, or freeze-dried foods. You should feed them several times a day in small quantities. In terms of water parameters, they prefer slightly acidic water with a temperature range of 72-78 degrees Fahrenheit. These fish are relatively easy to care for and are perfect for beginner aquarists.

Dwarf Pea Puffer (Carinotetraodon travancoriucus)

Dwarf Pea Puffer

The Dwarf Pea Puffer is a small freshwater fish that originates from Southeast Asia. You can find it in slow-moving rivers and ponds with plenty of vegetation in the wild. The Dwarf Pea Puffer is a peaceful fish that does well in community tanks. 

However, The Dwarf Pea Puffer is a peaceful fish, but it can be aggressive towards other dwarf puffers and towards fish that are similar in size and shape. Because of its small adult size (2.5 cm/1 inch), it is best suited for a 5-gallon tank. The ideal number of Dwarf Pea puffers to keep in 5 gallons of water is 3-4 fish.

Generally, the Dwarf Pea Puffer is an easy fish to care for and has a moderate care level. But it is important to maintain stable water parameters and to do regular water changes. The Dwarf Pea Puffer can live for 2-3 years when kept under adequate conditions. Although they are not the easiest fish to care for, the Dwarf Pea Puffer can make a charming addition to any aquarium.

Amano Shrimp (Caridina multidentate)

Amano Shrimp

Amano shrimp are a species of freshwater shrimp that originate from Asia. In the wild, they can be found in slow-moving rivers and streams. They get their name from Takashi Amano, a Japanese aquarist who popularized them in the aquarium hobby. 

Amano shrimp are one of the best choices for a 5-gallon tank because they stay relatively small (reaching adult sizes of 2-3 inches), are very peaceful, and are easy to care for. When keeping Amano shrimp in a 5-gallon tank, it is best to start with a 5-6 shrimp group and then add more as needed. 

These shrimp are Bottom dwellers and do best in tanks with plants and décor that provide hiding places. They are omnivorous and will eat both algae and leftover fish food. Amano shrimp are hardy and can tolerate a wide range of water parameters, but they prefer neutral to slightly acidic water with moderate hardness. They are not strong swimmers and prefer tanks with low water flow. 

Overall, Amano shrimp is a great choice for beginner aquarium hobbyists or those looking for low-maintenance pet shrimp.

Rosy Loach (Tuberoschistura arakanensis)

The Rosy Loach is a small freshwater fish that originates from Southeast Asia. It gets its name from its colorful scales, ranging in hue from pink to orange to red. Rosy Loaches typically inhabit slow-moving rivers and streams with soft, sandy bottoms in the wild. They are social creatures and often found in groups of 10 or more.

Rosy Loaches are a good choice for a 5-gallon tank because they stay relatively small (adults only grow to be 2-3 inches long) and are relatively low-maintenance. They are peaceful fish and have a relatively calm temperament. They are also not very demanding of diet and will happily eat most types of fish food.

 Regarding water parameters, Rosy Loaches prefer slightly alkaline water with a pH of 7.0-8.0 and a temperature of 68-77 degrees Fahrenheit. They are not particularly active swimmers and prefer to stick close to the bottom of the tank, making them well-suited for smaller tanks. Rosy Loaches are relatively easy to care for and make a good choice for beginner fishkeepers when it comes to caring.

Celestial Pearl Danios (Danio margaritatus)

Celestial Pearl Danios

Celestial Pearl Danios are small, sparkly freshwater fish that add to any 5-gallon tank. Adults only grow to be about an inch long, and they have a peaceful temperament, so they are well-suited to living in a community tank. In addition, they are omnivores, so they eat just about anything you put in the tank. 

As far as water parameters go, they prefer neutral to slightly acidic water with a temperature between 68 and 77 degrees Fahrenheit. They are active swimmers and prefer to live in schools, so it’s best to keep at least 3 or 4 of them in your 5-gallon tank. They are relatively easy to care for, but they appreciate lots of hiding places and vegetation in their tank because they are such active swimmers.

Dwarf Crayfish (Cambarellus)

Dwarf Crayfish

Dwarf crayfish are a popular pet for both beginner and experienced aquarium keepers. These little critters are perfect for small tanks of 5 gallons, as they only grow to be about 2 inches as adults. They are also relatively easy to care for, and their diet consists mostly of algae and small insects. In terms of water parameters, dwarf crayfish prefer neutral to slightly acidic water with a moderate hardness level. 

Generally, dwarf crayfish are also good swimmers and tend to stay near the bottom of the tank. As a result, they can be kept in a wide variety of tanks, provided that there are enough hiding places for them to feel secure. When it comes to temperament, Dwarf Crayfish are relatively peaceful, but they can be aggressive towards each other if their tank is too small. For this reason, it is generally best to keep only one Dwarf Crayfish per 5 gallons of water. ,

Chili Rasboras

Chili Rasboras

Chili rasboras (Boraras brigittae) are small, peaceful fish native to the slow-moving waters of Southeast Asia. They have a reddish body with a dark triangle on their tail fin, and they grow to adult size at about 1 inch long. 

In addition, these fish are fairly easy to care for and do not require special water parameters. Thus, they are perfect fish for a 5-gallon tank.  The ideal Chili Rasboras for a 5-gallon tank is 3-4 fish. Any more than that, and the tank may start to feel cramped. 

Chili Rasboras are omnivorous and will eat both pellets and flakes. However, they should also be given regular meals of live or frozen food such as brine shrimp or bloodworms. All in all, Chili Rasboras are a great choice for beginner aquarists looking for low-maintenance fish.

Sparkling Gourami

Sparkling Gourami

The sparkling gourami (Trichopsis pumila) is a small freshwater fish that originates from Southeast Asia. You can find it in slow-moving streams and ponds with plenty of vegetation in the wild. The adult size of this fish is only about 2 inches, making it a great option for smaller tanks like a 5-gallon tank. 

Moreover, if you are looking for a fish with a peaceful temperament to keep other small fish, sparkling gourami is perfect for you. Talking about diet, sparkling gourami is mostly omnivorous and prefers live foods. Although, at least this is the case with my fish. You might sometimes have a different preference. 

When it comes to water parameters, this fish prefers neutral to slightly acidic water with a temperature of 77-86 degrees Fahrenheit. The sparkling gourami is a surface dweller and has a unique swimming style – it often appears to be “walking” on the water using its pelvic fins. This fish is considered easy to care for, although it is sensitive to changes in water quality. You can undoubtedly keep an ideal number of 3 to 4 sparkling gouramis in a 5-gallon with ease.

Scarlet Badis

Scarlet badis [Dario Dario]

The Scarlet Badis is a beautiful freshwater fish native to Sri Lanka and India. It is best suited for a 5-gallon tank and can reach an adult size of 2.5 inches. The ideal number to keep in 5 gallons of water is 3-5 fish. 

The Scarlet Badis is a peaceful fish with a gentle temperament. Its diet consists mainly of small insects and larvae. The water parameters for the Scarlet Badis should be between 72-78 degrees Fahrenheit with a pH of 6.5-7.5. This fish is a bottom dweller and prefers to swim in the lower levels of the tank. The care level for this fish is moderate, and it is best suited for experienced and beginner aquarium owners.

Pygmy Corydoras

Pygmy Corydoras

The Pygmy Corydoras is a small, peaceful freshwater fish from South America. It is typically found in slow-moving rivers and streams with murky waters and dense vegetation. 

The Pygmy Corydoras is best suited for a 5-gallon tank because it is a relatively small fish with an adult size of only 2 inches. This fish is also very easy to care for, requiring only basic water parameters and a simple diet. Moreover, these fish are schooling fish, so keeping at least 6 in a 5-gallon tank is best. 

Furthermore, the Pygmy Corydoras is a bottom-dwelling fish that prefers to swim near the bottom of the tank. As a result, it is best to keep only a few Pygmy Corydoras in a 5-gallon tank to have plenty of room to swim and hide. Overall, the Pygmy Corydoras is an ideal fish for beginners due to its small size, low care requirements, and peaceful temperament.

Glass Catfish (Kryptopterus bicirrhis)

glass catfish

Glass catfish are a small, peaceful species native to Southeast Asia. The adult size is only around 2 inches, making them a perfect fit for a 5-gallon tank. Glass catfish are also relatively easy to care for and have a calm temperament. They are a bottom-dwelling species that prefer to swim in groups, so the ideal number to keep in a 5-gallon tank is 3-5 fish. 

Glass catfish are omnivores, and their diet should consist of both meaty and plant-based foods. In addition, they prefer water with neutral pH and moderate hardness levels, and they are a semi-aggressive swimmer. Therefore, glass catfish are undoubtedly a great option for beginner aquarium keepers.

Emerald Dwarf Rasbora (Celestichthys erythromicron)

Emerald Dwarf Rasboras are a peaceful, schooling fish from South East Asia. In the wild, they can be found in slow-moving waters with dense vegetation, such as swampy areas and rice paddies. They are relatively small fish, with adults reaching a maximum size of just 1.5 inches. This makes them an ideal choice for a 5-gallon tank. 

Emerald Dwarf Rasboras are relatively easy to care for, and their diet consists mostly of small insects and crustaceans. They prefer soft and slightly acidic water, with a temperature between 72 and 82 degrees Fahrenheit. 

When kept in a 5-gallon tank, Emerald Dwarf Rasboras should be kept in a school of at least six fish. They are a mid-level swimmer and prefer to stay close to the vegetation in their tank. Overall, Emerald Dwarf Rasboras are a great choice for beginner aquarists or those looking for a peaceful addition to their tank.

Boeseman’s Rainbow Fish (Boraras brigittae)

Boesemani Rainbow Fish

Boeseman’s Rainbow Fish is a beautiful freshwater fish native to the muddy waters of Lake Sentani in Indonesia. Adults can grow up to 4 inches in length, and they have a bright yellow body with blue stripes. They are peaceful fish and are not picky eaters. So, they are a great option if you have a 5-gallon tank. 

A 5-gallon tank is sufficient for a small group of these fish. You can house up to six of them in your tank. Boeseman’s Rainbow Fish are medium-sized fish that like to swim in the middle and upper levels of the tank. They are not demanding in terms of water parameters, but they do prefer slightly alkaline water. 

Boeseman’s fish accept most commercial foods, but they also enjoy live and frozen foods. They are one of the easiest fish to keep and care for. So, they undoubtedly make a great addition to any freshwater aquarium.

Congo Tetra (Micralestes interrupts)

Firemouth Cichlid Tank mates

The Congo tetra (Phenacogrammus interruptus) is a freshwater fish that originates from the Congo River basin in Africa. The adult size of this fish is about 2.5 inches (6.4 cm), making it a good choice for a 5-gallon tank. Congo tetras have a peaceful temperament and should be kept with other peaceful fish species of similar adult size. This species is omnivorous and will eat both plant and animal material. Their diet consists of small invertebrates, insects, and plankton in the wild. 

The ideal number of Congo tetras to keep in 5 gallons of water is 4-6 fish. This fish species prefers slightly acidic water with a pH range of 6.0-7.5 and a temperature range of 72-82 degrees Fahrenheit (22-28 degrees Celsius). Congo tetras are middle to upper-level swimmers and prefer to school with other species members. The care level for this species is considered easy to moderate, making them a good choice for beginner aquarium hobbyists.

Rummy Nose Tetra (Hemigrammus bleheri)

rummy nose tetra

Rummy nose tetras are small, peaceful fish that are popular for beginner aquarists. They are native to the Amazon basin in South America, and their natural habitat is slow-moving waters with plenty of vegetation. Rummy nose tetras are relatively easy to care for, and they do well in a 5-gallon tank. The adult size is around 2 inches, and the ideal number to keep in 5 gallons of water is 3-5 fish. 

Rummy nose tetras have a reputation for being shy, but they are actually quite active and love to swim in schools. They are omnivorous, and their diet should include both meaty and vegetable-based foods. Rummy nose tetras prefer slightly acidic water temperatures between 75-82 degrees Fahrenheit. They are a mid-level swimmer and do best in an aquarium with plenty of hiding places. 

So, all these are your options. Which one do you think best fits you?

Best 5 Gallon Tank Fish Combinations 

To state the truth, a 5-gallon tank is not good for keeping a wide variety of fish in combination. But I do have a few options for you that will work.

Invertebrate Community Tank

Consider an invertebrate community tank if you’re not interested in having any fish that swim around your aquarium and would prefer something a little more low-key. Shrimp, snails, and crabs are good options for a small aquarium. You can keep ten cherry fish and one netrile snail in this combination.

Mixed Community Tank

Mixed community tanks are a great option for keeping a small group of fish in their five-gallon tank. This type of setup allows you to mix and match different fish species, giving you a wide variety of colors and personalities to choose from. Some of the best fish for a mixed community tank include:

  • Danios
  • Amano shrimp
  • Killi fish
  • Betta Fish ( should be a male and a female)

How To Set Up A 5 Gallon Tank?

Setting a 5-gallon tank is a tricky task. Usually, beginners assume that a small tank is easier to care for than a large one. But the truth is, it’s actually more difficult to set up and maintain a smaller aquarium.

So, to help you, here are some easy tips for setting up a 5-gallon tank:

Set One: Find A Perfect Location

The first thing you need to do is find a location for your tank. It should be where it won’t get too much sunlight or too much artificial light. It’s also important to find a spot where the temperature stays consistent.

Set Two: Choose The Right Tank

There are many different kinds of tanks, but not all of them are good for a five-gallon tank. It would be best if you found a tank that’s made out of glass or acrylic.

Set Three: Get The Appropriate Filter

One of the most important things in a fish tank is the filter. It’s responsible for keeping the water clean and free of toxins. There are many different kinds of filters, but you need to find one that’s specifically designed for a five-gallon tank.

Set Four: Choose The Substrate

The substrate is what goes on the bottom of the tank. It can be gravel, sand, or even rocks. It’s important to choose a safe substrate for your fish that won’t cause them any harm.

Set Five: Decorate The Tank

Once you have all the necessary components, it’s time to decorate the tank. This is where you can get creative and make the tank your own. Just be sure not to put anything in the tank that could harm your fish.

Now that you know how to set up a five-gallon tank, it’s time to know some problems that you might face.

You can choose:

Issues You Might Face In 5 Gallon Tank

Generally, you might face a few problems when you keep fish in a smaller tank like a 5-gallon tank. These issues are:

  • Less water volume means the water temperature can change more quickly.
  • Ammonia and nitrites can build up more quickly in a smaller tank.
  • You might not be able to maintain as wide a variety of fish in a smaller tank.
  • A smaller tank is more vulnerable to power outages and other disruptions.

However, if you put the right-sized fish, set the tank properly, and keep a perfect maintenance schedule, you can avoid all these problems.

What Are The Fish That Are Best Not To Put In 5 Gallon Tank?

A 5-gallon tank is a very small tank. Furthermore, when you set it up with substrates, plants, and decorations, the space that’s left for fish can be even smaller. Therefore, it’s important to choose your fish carefully. You don’t want to overcrowd the tank and cause stress on the fish or create water quality issues.

So you must never keep the following fish if you have a small 5-gallon tank:

  • Goldfish: They can grow up to 12 inches long.
  • Oscar fish: These guys can get as big as a foot long.
  • Common pleco: These bottom feeders can reach lengths of 18 inches.
  • Arowana: These magnificent fish can get up to three feet long!

Even though these are popular fish, they’re just too big for a tiny tank like yours. You have enough options. Just pick one from above. I guess it is better to stick to the small and peaceful fish. Isn’t it? Why force something that might harm your fish or make them uncomfortable?

Where Can You Get A Fish For Your 5 Gallon Tank?

Buying a fish is a task that needs to be done with care. First, you want to make sure that your fish is healthy and fit into your tank size-wise. Here are some places to buy fish for your five-gallon tank.

Pet Store

Your local pet store is always a great place to start when looking for a new addition to your aquarium. The staff there can help guide you towards choosing a fish that will be a compatible addition to your home. They can also offer advice on how to care for your new pet.

Online

Another option is looking into online retailers that specialize in aquarium fish. This could be a great option if you’re looking for a specific type of fish that your local pet store may not carry. Do some research on the retailer to ensure they have a good reputation for selling healthy fish.

Breeders

You can also get them from breeders. This is a great option if you want a specific type of fish hard to find in stores. When getting your fish from a breeder, ask about the fish’s health and what kind of care they will need.

You can choose anyone from these three places to get your pal. If you have already owned one, please share the place where you got it from.

FAQs 

Which Is The Biggest Fish To Keep In A 5 Gallon Tank?

The biggest fish you could keep in a five-gallon tank would be a betta fish. Bettas are beautiful and come in many different colors. They are also very hardy and can live in a wide range of water conditions. However, they do require some special care. For example, they need a warm water temperature and plenty of hiding places.

Can You Put More Than Two Species Of Fish In A 5 Gallon Tank?

The quick answer is no. You should never put more than one fish species in a five-gallon tank. The main reason for this is that different fish have different space requirements. For example, a betta needs at least two gallons of space, while a goldfish needs at least four gallons of space.

If you put more than one fish species in a five-gallon tank, the fish will not have enough space to swim and explore.

Does 5 Gallon Tank Need Regular Water Exchange? 

Yes, it does! A five-gallon tank needs a water change every two to three weeks. This will help to keep the water quality high and the fish healthy.

How Many Fish Can You Keep In 5 Gallon Tank?

The number of fish you can keep in a five-gallon tank depends on fish species. For example, you can keep two goldfish in a five-gallon tank, but you can only keep one betta in a five-gallon tank.

It is important to remember that each fish needs at least two gallons of space, so you need to take that into account when choosing the number of fish for your tank.

What Can You Keep In 5 Gallon Tank Besides Fish?

You can also keep snails, shrimp, and other invertebrates in a five-gallon tank. These animals are a great addition to any tank, and they can help keep the tank clean. In addition, invertebrates are a great option for a five-gallon tank because they do not need as much space as fish.

Conclusion

Summing up, you can get several options for a fish for your five-gallon tank. Depending on what you are looking for, you can get them from a pet store, online, or from breeders. You should never put more than one fish species in a five-gallon tank, and you will need to do regular water changes to keep the fish healthy.

Invertebrates are also a great option for a five-gallon tank. Thanks for reading! I hope this was helpful.

What are some of your favorite fish? Let me know in the comments below!